Category Archives: Webcomic Business

About actual business and webcomics

10 things your webcomic could be doing better

When we are starting up, and hell even when we are veteran webcomic creators, we make mistakes, take short cuts and overlook things. This can lead to sub-par performance in some aspect of our webcomic, hindering our efforts to build audience, community, and ultimately readership. There are definitely some things that turn webcomic readers off, and just fixing up a few things that could be really deterring readers from getting into your comic could make a big difference in converting visitors to dedicated fans.

Here is a list of 10 things to consider that could be holding your webcomic back from glory and what you can do to fix it.

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On-Demand printer review – Ka-blam!

All us webcomic folks, at some point, generally get faced with the prospect of printing our comics. Because of our small print runs and almost non-existent budgets, we tend to opt for print-on demand provides. There are a handful that actually specialze in small run, on-demand comics.

As a graphic designer who works almost exclusively in print, I’ve worked for about a decade with a number of different printers (large and small). This gives me a lot of expertise and expectation when getting anything printed as to what kind of quality I should get from a printer. So I’ve recently printed my first set of comics, and  as such I’m exploring the world of on-demand comic printing. In an effort to help the community, I will bring my findings to you all so when you come to the time when you want to print some comics, you’ll have some perspective.

My first stop on this Road is one of the more well known On-demand services: Ka-blam.

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5 Tips on Hiring an artist for your webcomic project

It’s generally a known fact that there are usually way more writers out there in need of artists than the other way around. If you spend any time in any of the webcomic or art communities you’ll run into the age old problem of the writer trying to locate art talent to bring his writing to life, but they come into the search ill prepared to woo an artist to their project. Many are clueless as to what is required on their end to look professional, what artists expect to see, how to get positive attention, and what they can expect to pay, or if they can get work for free.  In this article we’ll have a look at what it takes to score an artist for your webcomic project (and not make yourself look like a douche in the process).

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Webcomics: Preparing for Conventions

This is sort of a little more personal than some of my other articles, as I myself am feeling this one out after a few half arsed attempts at doing conventions over four years ago with friends or as a tag-along to get a sense of what doing conventions is all about. But it will be my first time as a solo act, and the first time I’ve done conventions on my home turf of Vancouver, BC, Canada.

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Webcomics: Making Webcomics that Stand out

It used to be, back in oh, say 1998, that it wasn’t hard to get noticed as a webcomic. Mostly because there just wasn’t the same kind of competition that there is today, so anything that was half ways decent could get a readership just by being persistent, it didn’t actually have to be good per se. Today, that’s changed. With so many hundreds of thousands of webcomics to choose from and only 24 hours in a day, readers are getting pickier and pickier about what they stick around for. If you want to get noticed these days,  you have to stand out. The trick of course is ‘how?’.

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Webcomics & Money: Merchandising a Webcomic

It is often (although not always) a dream of a webcomic creator to make anything from a little money to support the webcomic, to an entire living off their webcomic creation. Generally many strategies have to be employed, but usually the first thing one thinks of is creating products based on or related to a comic, also commonly referred to as ‘merchandising’.

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Webcomics: Making Money

Well it’s November, and coming along with snow, ice, and people who can’t drive on winter roads, Christmas and the consumer money-spending frenzy that follows is just around the corner. People are out there hungry to spend money, and in the spirit of such, there are a lot of webcomic creators who’s wallets are very hungry to capture some of that action.

In the spirit of the season, this month, I’ll be talking about various ways and tips about making money, monetizing, and merchandising your webcomic, and finally what it takes to make a living at your webcomicing dreams. This first article is about what you need to begin making money on your webcomic.

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Webcomics: Building Readership

What is a webcomic without readers? Let’s face it, most of us creator types aren’t putting our hearts and souls into a comic creation that we don’t want any one to read. We put it on the web and out into the world to garner attention and interest, entertaining and communicating with the masses. Without some masses to communicate to, it seems pretty futile. For that reason, its no surprise that every webcomic author is eternally looking to build, rebuild, or expand a current readership. But how do you accomplish this task?

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Webcomics: Playing the Advertising Game

One of the most challenging tasks that lay ahead for both aspiring and established webcomics is getting the word out to your audience (or potential audience) that you exist. In the past, link exchanges, top links, banner exchanges and webrings were enough to bring a steady flow of visitors. These days however, the dynamics of the web have changed, and creators are forced to look into more commercial methods of marketing, namely advertising. But advertising can be expensive pursuit and what if you want to MAKE money with ads? Read on, and find out how to minimize your advertising costs, while maximizing the value of your own site’s ads.

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Mushing around 1000 fans in webcomics

Okay, if you’ve never heard of this (and I don’t blame you, you’re probably not into this stuff like I am…) but if you are serious about making any kinda coin with your webcomic (or anything else that’s creatively produced indepentantly in the internet, such as music, fiction, blogging, etc.), its a rather interesting theory.

Originally written by Kevin Kelly, the 1000 true fans theory states in a nutshell that if you want to make a living off your creative genious on the internet, you need to cultivate “1000 true fans”. A true fan being defined as someone who is so zealous about your work, they’d buy everything 10 times over, even your belly button lint if it was sold on Ebay. Basically someone who truely is ‘fanatical’ about what you are doing. This post turned out to be a pretty hot topic across many blogs, which even prompted further posts, against, defending, and comparing to similar theories, even some temperance from reality of doing it. Go ahead, read it, come back. You’ll need to know what I’m talking about for the rest of this post.

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